Mr. Mero: 2XXX

This is Part Four of a short fiction.

Part OnePart TwoPart Three

J-Seven associated the tonal countdown that had come bursting into his eardrum implants with progress. Not only did it represent the end of his duly allotted rest period, but it also signalled the start of a personal learning phase. He had another two of these scheduled, and he contemplated what might help to drive him through them. His upcoming briefing concerned History, a subject far too removed from the future he placed his true interest in.

At least Vitrius’ latest model was a greater comfort on the temples, which resulted in an appreciated lack of headaches.…   [continue reading]

Mr. Mero: 20XX

This is Part Three of a short fiction.

Part One — Part Two — Part Four

Mr. Mero’s morning was off to a promising start. As advertised, an anaesthetic injection had worked wonders on his surprisingly decrepit spine, allowing him to stand without agony. It gave him the extra energy to program the MatterMate properly, which led to a much richer approximation of tea and toast. But a phone call the previous evening was the real reason for his mood.

The conversation suggested his involvement in Vitrius’ latest prototype. Their contact meant that he could get personal access to an exciting, if elusive, new development.…   [continue reading]

Star Trek: Discovery: Klingons, Crew Dynamics and Political Fiction [REPORT]

We’ve often discussed Star Trek here. In fact, our very first podcast episode opens with a conversation about Captain Kirk‘s third season sexism. I even followed that up with an article, and Star Trek has been a common subject of other guestless podcasts. Accordingly, it makes sense that I take a look at the two instalments of Star Trek: Discovery currently available to us. I’ve been an enormous fan of the franchise for the majority of my conscious life, so I hope I can provide some context and perspective beyond that of a fresher viewer.

With my overall feelings ending rather mixed, it would be pointless to sum up my thoughts in an opening soundbite.…   [continue reading]

The Best and Worst of Trailers [2016]

At first I was going to make this piece an overview of trailers in their entirety, using two from this year as examples.  Instead, it occurred to me that i’d simply be stealing an upcoming subject from fellow writer, Ben Mulholland.  As such, I thought it more befitting of me to look in depth at the two examples.  One staggeringly bad, another breathtakingly good, there are a lot of meaty tangents to go off on from both.

Trailers, on the whole, are mere promotional tools to rally the populous.  While they can be sometimes woefully inaccurate, it wouldn’t be unfair to judge a film or game by them.  …   [continue reading]

Silent Running

silent_running_poster_03

Silent Running is laughed at far too often than it deserves, but that’s mainly directed towards the pretty awful Joan Baez tunes that pepper the piece and occasionally campy dialogue throughout…

When getting over these speed bumps however, the film actually ends up being an awesomely coherent and thematic brother to the far more lauded and well-known 2001: A Space Odyssey.  That’s not even a facile analogy either, but one of the fundamental ideas it was based on.  Silent Running‘s main creative force, Douglas Trumbull, had a large hand in the creation of the entire of science fiction’s aesthetic.  This can’t be denied when you look at it his work, which is on display in such movies as Blade Runner, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, The Andromeda Strain and Star Trek: The Motion Picture.…   [continue reading]