Dion Lunadon (The D4, A Place to Bury Strangers) Interview: On his Debut Solo LP

Having spent over two decades with several bands including A Place to Bury Strangers, The D4 and The Scavengers, it’s surprising to realize Dion Lunadon hadn’t released a solo work sooner and, even more so, to learn it wasn’t planned to exist.

“I hadn’t written by myself for years and felt I needed to create something with no compromises and something that reflected who I am. Out of anything I’ve ever done, this record definitely captures that more than any other. I wasn’t planning on releasing any of it, which is a great place to write from. I wrote it for me.” 

With the help of Bambara’s Blaze Batch, APTBS bandmate Robi Gonzalez and Chris Woodhouse (recording engineer for Thee Oh Sees and Ty Segall), Lunadon wrote and completed the album over three months in Brooklyn, NY.…   [continue reading]

BONZIE Interview: Zone on Nine, Collaboration and Intimacy

I first discovered BONZIE, an American musician whose talent betrays her age, purely by accident one evening. Since, I haven’t been able to stop listening to her oddly cathartic music; strong in the belief that I haven’t heard songwriting this refreshing in years. Her first record, Rift Into the Secret of Things, is a gorgeous trek through melodious brevity. While short, the potency of the material within leapt from my speakers with an understated purity. To be more accurate, the music of BONZIE laps against your eardrum with all the playful provocation of relentless waves.

Like soft ocean ripples, her songwriting brings with it a depth that sounds like it’s swirled the entire planet to reach the quiet beach you find it on.…   [continue reading]

Gorillaz – “Humanz” [ALBUM REVIEW]

Among musicians, and music fans, pop music sometimes gets a bit of a bad rap. Personally, I’ve found the world of pop music across the decades to be a fascinating and enjoyable one. While I zoned out of the pop world for years, I could always rely on Gorillaz to fill that hole. From Clint Eastwood to Plastic Beach (The Fall doesn’t really count), Gorillaz have been a surefire hit-factory. Unfortunately, whenever they would come out with a fresh batch, they’d inevitably bugger back off again for a handful of years.

Everyone knows that Gorillaz are, in fact, a cipher for Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett.…   [continue reading]

Juiceboxxx Interview: Freaked Out American Loser, Thunder Zone and Scaling Up

After sailing the underground for the better part of his life, Juiceboxxx still has an undying thirst to move ever onward. He’s made a name for himself with uniquely direct music, and a live show that lives up to it in spades. Each release sees him delving further and further into what the fuck it even means to be alive; sometimes with anger and confusion, others with an optimistic abandon.

This has helped him maintain a dedicated cult audience, who religiously follow his various interesting endeavours. His strong musical catalogue is just one arm of the Juiceboxxx world; a strange place encompassing energy drinks, radio shows, self-deprecating video-blogs and more.…   [continue reading]

Kendrick Lamar – “Damn” [ALBUM REVIEW]

It’s always unfortunate when an artist has to follow an epochal album. Considering Kid A in the wake of OK Computer was never fair. Pink Floyd‘s awful Final Cut was doomed after The Wall. Placing Kendrick Lamar‘s previous album, To Pimp a Butterflyin such a legendary ballpark is obvious to anyone who’s heard the record without blinkers. As a result, Lamar’s fresh follow-up was always going to find itself trapped under expectations and heft. Released five days ago, Damn has more written about it in comparison to its predecessor than its own merits.

This is natural.…   [continue reading]

Boards of Canada – Tomorrow’s Harvest

Beyond the static-tined avalanche of white noise and synthesiser synaesthesia, Boards of Canada’s recent Tomorrow’s Harvest L.P. is a surprisingly comprehensive journey towards – and eventually away from – collapse.  But what stands so intriguing in this breakdown?  What leads the release of this record to captivate so easily with giddy addiction?  And just what exactly is being portrayed across the ice-pines and bark-bergs of this somehow begotten, faintly belated landscape?

First, one has to be careful in attempting to view the effort as a concept album in the strictest terms.  Despite its clear thematic loyalties (mostly to secret broadcast, ghostly premonitions and narcissistic evolution), there is no great or detailed tale to be found under the layers of softly structured tone poetry. …   [continue reading]