Blood on the Goban: Exploring the Myths of an Ancient Art

This article is a re-formatted extract fromย Issue #1: Birth, which you can read more about here.

Go, in its impenetrable elegance, is quite possibly the oldest board game that still sees widespread play. A product of ancient China, its popularity in East Asia far surpasses that of chess. In comparison, Iโ€™ve heard Goโ€™s complexity equated with that of a war; opposing the self-contained battles fought on a chessboard. Though exaggerated, thereโ€™s some truth to that analogy, which has helped Go to maintain its appeal for over twenty-five centuries. In fact, it was once considered a founding art of the Chinese aristocracy.…   [continue reading]

Nameless: The Tragedy of Anonymity in Death

Death is a subject we find difficult to discuss. Strangely, it’s the only thing we all have in common. Though we’ll each feel its inevitable grip, we also experience its tragic totality in the loss of those we love. Usually when somebody dies, we celebrate their passing with a fitting memorial. We hope to receive the same, almost as some grand punctuation mark to our lives. We expect a headstone, of some description, or the grim dust of cremation’s ashes. Whatever we might choose as an epitaph, our hope is that our earthly names may at least remain.

For some, however, such immortality has been cold in its desertion.…   [continue reading]