Dan Renton Skinner on Anarchic Comedy (SCP Mini)

For our latest SCP Mini (compressed editions of our regular podcasts), we’ve used our interview with Dan Renton Skinner as a source. As someone with a wealth of experience within British comedy, he had much to say on the subject. I took particular interest, when speaking to him, in the anarchic nature of certain comedies of the early 90’s. Thanks to his widespread work with Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer, it’s something he clearly understands. In more modern times, some of the punk has disappeared from our national humorists. As Skinner himself notes, they simply don’t allow that aesthetic on syndicated television anymore.…   [continue reading]

The Myriad Talents of Doug Lussenhop

This article ties in to a podcast I recorded with Doug Lussenhop, available here.

Doug Lussenhop, also known as DJ Douggpound, is someone with far more output than many might expect. Mostly, he’s remembered as the editor who helped shape Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! into its distinctive and influential form. While his editing work represents a huge catalogue, it’s the tip of an incredibly intriguing iceberg. Lussenhop is never content to sit back, comfortable, in any one box. His creativity has branches in almost all forms of media, from music and writing to innovative live performances and apps.…   [continue reading]

Secret Cave Office Chart [JULY 2017]

I’m not sure how it ended up this way, but this month’s is the most disparate offering I’ve curated yet. Still, there’s only one point in it that I think is uncomfortable and jarring. Be aware of the transition between Boards of Canada‘s Satellite Anthem Icarus and Modest Mouse‘s Ocean Breathes Salty; it’s a particularly nasty one. Unfortunately, it was a bit too late to do anything about and Ocean Breathes Salty is good enough to get past it. Beyond that, this month’s playlist skips from genre to genre without a moment’s rest. On the whole, it works quite well with a playful verve.…   [continue reading]

BONZIE Interview: Zone on Nine, Collaboration and Intimacy

I first discovered BONZIE, an American musician whose talent betrays her age, purely by accident one evening. Since, I haven’t been able to stop listening to her oddly cathartic music; strong in the belief that I haven’t heard songwriting this refreshing in years. Her first record, Rift Into the Secret of Things, is a gorgeous trek through melodious brevity. While short, the potency of the material within leapt from my speakers with an understated purity. To be more accurate, the music of BONZIE laps against your eardrum with all the playful provocation of relentless waves.

Like soft ocean ripples, her songwriting brings with it a depth that sounds like it’s swirled the entire planet to reach the quiet beach you find it on.…   [continue reading]

Juiceboxxx Interview: Freaked Out American Loser, Thunder Zone and Scaling Up

After sailing the underground for the better part of his life, Juiceboxxx still has an undying thirst to move ever onward. He’s made a name for himself with uniquely direct music, and a live show that lives up to it in spades. Each release sees him delving further and further into what the fuck it even means to be alive; sometimes with anger and confusion, others with an optimistic abandon.

This has helped him maintain a dedicated cult audience, who religiously follow his various interesting endeavours. His strong musical catalogue is just one arm of the Juiceboxxx world; a strange place encompassing energy drinks, radio shows, self-deprecating video-blogs and more.…   [continue reading]

Secret Cave Office Chart [FEBRUARY 2017]

Yep, I’ll admit with my hands in the air that this is hardly an original idea.  Radiohead have been doing office charts for years, and I can only assume that thousands of hip blogs and magazines have adopted it.  Of course, it doesn’t really matter.  I just thought it would be a fun monthly thing to do.  Besides, I’ve got a High Fidelity-esque predilection for making playlists anyway.  Neither of the Bens have anything to do with this, in case they get ashamed by the choices.  This is just my own personal “writing an article for Secret Cave” playlist.  …   [continue reading]

ACME (08) – Ancestral Jottings

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Ancestral Jottings
(in the lands before ACME)

Chipped rock flew through humid, bubbling air.  Disordered lines in cave walls connected and separated in haphazard heavy-handedness.  Architects of some new place, intangible and distant to even its benefactors, hacked with primitive bashers and scratchers; patterns even they didn’t understand.  This was when man still bawled its aimless evolutionary whines – a communication, but with all the lexical weight of bleats and barks.  Here, as language was beginning to grind into motion, so too were the first wild lunges made in the direction of creativity.

A beat rose up in the night, rolled out on rocks and animal skin. …   [continue reading]

Mogwai – My Father My King

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When we think of Mogwai, at one point the undisputed champions of post-rock, we usually think of their impressive debut, Young Team, or their extensive work on soundtracks (such as Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait and Les Revenants).  However, Mogwai have quite a number of releases under their belt – many of which are tragically underrated.  One of these is the individual track, My Father My King; a twenty minute long belter released on its lonesome in 2001.  Presumably left off any official album for its length and singularity, it’s found a niche for itself as one of those fandom gems that really deserves a little more attention.…   [continue reading]

The Streets – Original Pirate Material

I was really rather young when Original Pirate Material was released; just coming up on teenage life and embroiled in the noisy cacophony of The White Stripes (who I still hold in high regard).  As such, it took some time for the record to click for me, although I could already relate to the grim, working-class picture that Mike Skinner presents – having grown up around the images he conjures.  I simply found the confrontational nature of such tracks as Don’t Mug Yourself and Sharp Darts to be distasteful and a difficult listen.

The power of its themes and the reality behind them was what compelled me to eventually buy it after a few years growth, considering it an essential album despite not being fully behind its musical context.  …   [continue reading]

Pavement – Brighten the Corners

Pavement are one of those cult bands that you just eventually come across one day, and it may be hard to pin down exactly how they appeared in your life.  For me, I can’t at all remember who introduced me to them, or how I found their work.  Despite the vessel that brought them into my life being clouded in mystery, I can still recall strongly how I felt upon hearing Stereo (Brighten the Corners‘ opening track) for that first time.  I was already a big fan of Pixies, and a few other calling card bands in that alternative-guitar-rock style, yet Pavement backed up their raw and esoteric ditties with an amazing intelligence and wit that I hadn’t heard before.  …   [continue reading]