Welcome to the Internet

All artworks included in this piece are the work of Katrine Claassens, and are represented in monochrome here (as they appear inย Issue #2: Birth). You can see them in full colour at Katrine’s site, or order your own copy of our zine through our store or Patreon.

In this intimate series of works, Katrine Claassens paints both abandoned and much-loved images culled from the internet. By carefully selecting reference material from digital sources, Claassens distils the absurdist nature of internet humour to bear witness to a tragicomedy otherwise ignored. Material gathered from abandoned Twitter accounts, internet memes, stills from GIFs, and badly executed flash photography become adopted beauties when taken under her wing.…   [continue reading]

Caedmon: Creating Creativity (Maurizio Fusillo Interview)

This article ties in to a podcast I recorded with Maurizio Fusillo, the creator of Caedmon, available here.

Atย Secret Cave, we’ve always had an obsession with the output of artificial intelligence. Across a variety of fascinating bots and other projects, it’s been shown that their artwork is more than worthy of scrutiny. Since the birth of the internet, and the entropic prevalence of technology over the past century, the capabilities of such bots has improved at a vast rate. It’s allowedย certain older ideas, about the creation of art without emotion, to be explored in the depth they deserve.…   [continue reading]

Stefan Bohacek on AI and Pareidolia (SCP Mini)

This week, Benjamin brought out an SCP Mini based around his interview with Stefan Bohacek. As the founder of BotWiki, he’s someone with an impressive knowledge on the nature of artificial intelligence. In this video, he highlights an interesting phenomenon. Pareidolia is the force in our minds which makes us see faces in toast, or on the surface of Mars. When applied to interactionย with bots, it can have a profound impact on our perspectives. Despite knowing that an AI is a construct, with clear limits to its capability, we can easily project humanity onto them regardless.

However, the uncanny valley always snaps us out of it eventually.…   [continue reading]