Secret Cave Podcast #5: Radiohead, Final Fantasy, Filter Bubble

It’s all kicking off in the fifth episode of the Secret Cave podcast. Lee and I have arguments about turn-based combat, the best Radiohead album, Final Fantasy’s finest era, and Rasta samples in the Predator movies.

In this episode, we mainly cover Radiohead, Final Fantasy and the hidden algorithms behind how we’re shown the world. As always, we’ll be announcing episodes on Twitter, and streaming them on Twitch.

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…But for now, listen to this week’s episode:

📻 in this episode, we discuss:

  • Thoughts on Radiohead’s A Moon Shaped Pool
  • How your listening environment affects music
  • On True Love Waits
  • Does a high production value affect emotional reaction?
  • Radiohead albums, ranked
  • Why Amnesiac can’t be Radiohead’s best album
  • Consistent themes in Radiohead albums
  • On Hatewatching
  • How does hatewatching work?
  • The complexity of Karl Pilkington
  • How much of Karl Pilkington’s personality is real?
  • Hatewatching and familiarity
  • On the hilarity of Jeff Wayne’s Musical Version of The War of the Worlds
  • Attraction to things with huge back catalogs
  • A heated argument about Predator
  • On Final Fantasy XV
  • 2D Final Fantasy vs 3D Final Fantasy
  • Does FFXV depart too much from the FF blueprint?
  • The much-anticipated features of FFXV
  • Turn-based combat vs. Active combat
  • Is turn-based combat dying?
  • Getting the platinum trophy in Rayman Legends
  • Text-based RPGs
  • Inside the filter bubble
  • How algorithms impact the way we discover content online
  • Will new voices have a tough time being heard?
  • When counterculture becomes culture
  • Popping the filter bubble
  • A bit of fourth wall-breaking chat about Secret Cave

🔗 links mentioned:

Music credit: Nuclear Winter — Baby Mawson

Leave a comment or tweet us @_secretcave if you have questions or anything you’d like us to address in the next episode.

Space landscape-obsessed dreck penman. Appears on TechCrunch, The Next Web, and on Secret Cave in a far less restrained capacity.