The Brain That Wouldn’t Die (1962) [COMMENTARY]

The Brain That Wouldn’t Die
DIRECTOR: Joseph Green
STARRING: Jason (Herb) Evers, Virginia Leith, Leslie Daniel

Completed in 1959, but not released until 1962, The Brain That Wouldn’t Die has one of the best titles I’ve ever come across. Produced in the same year as Attack of the Giant Leeches, it does a much better job of being coherent, likeable and gripping. Unfortunately, it devolves into a sexist and meandering plot. Its opening is strong enough to make it memorable, however. Overall an enjoyable hour with some genuinely disturbing moments!

From Wikipedia:

The main plot focuses upon a mad doctor who develops a means to keep human body parts alive.

…   [continue reading]

Attack of the Giant Leeches (1959) [COMMENTARY]

Attack of the Giant Leeches
DIRECTOR: Bernard L. Kowalski
STARRING: Ken Clark, Yvette Vickers, Jan Shepherd

This mess, known alternatively as The Giant Leeches, should be ashamed of itself for being created in 1959. This is because Attack of the Giant Leeches is a truly terrible piece of work with, as far as I can tell, no redeeming features whatsoever. It’s hard to believe that this laughably awful dross has anything to do with the legendary Roger Corman, but it does.  However, it does make The Amazing Mr. X look like a work of genius.

From Wikipedia:

In the Florida Everglades, a pair of larger-than-human, intelligent leeches live in an underwater cave.

…   [continue reading]

The Amazing Mr. X (1948) [COMMENTARY]

The Amazing Mr. X
DIRECTOR: Bernard Vorhaus
STARRING: Turhan Bey, Lynn Bari, Cathy O’Donnell

First released in 1948, The Amazing Mr. X is a public domain film notable for being considered a bit ridiculous even in its time. This makes it a perfect first choice for a new long-running series, where i’ll be providing a contemporary commentary on top. As a side note, this film is also known as The Spiritualist.

From Wikipedia:

Two years after her husband’s death, Christine Faber (Lynn Bari) thinks she hears her late husband (Donald Curtis) calling out of the surf on the beach one night.

…   [continue reading]

Tension, Paranoia, and All The President’s Men

If Watergate’s so goddamned important, who in the hell are Woodward and Bernstein?

All The President’s Men is a film that I wouldn’t have normally chosen to watch.

Made in 1976, it follows young Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein’s investigation into early Watergate evidence. Relying heavily on vague hints and anonymous sources, the pair break news on the biggest scandal in U.S. history, and the events that led up to the only time a U.S. president has resigned.

Carl Bernstein: [Walking up to the Sloans’ house] All these neat, little houses and all these nice, little streets… It’s hard to believe that something’s wrong with some of those little houses.

…   [continue reading]

Entertainment (2015)

Hear the writers discuss this subject on the Secret Cave Podcast!

When Entertainment premiered at 2015’s Sundance Film Festival, the response it garnered was somewhat predictable.  Numerous walkouts peppered its first showing, indicative of its uncomfortable confrontation.  Certainly a test of patience, it’s a work that demands significant effort on the part of the audience.  However, this is a recurring feature of the creatives involved: director and writer Rick Alverson, star and writer Gregg Turkington and writer Tim Heidecker.  It’s easy to take against their approach, labelling it as pretentious and lazy.  The sad truth is, that would be all too often accurate of others.  …   [continue reading]

Blade Runner 2049 [TRAILER REACTIONS]

Hear the writers discuss this subject on the Secret Cave Podcast!
I eventually saw Blade Runner 2049, and subsequently wrote about it here.

I am absolutely the right person at Secret Cave to write this.  That’s something I believe both Bens would yield to, well aware of my lifelong love for Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner.  It’s been my favourite film since I was around sixteen years old.  Even before that it was ever-present in my upbringing.  A favourite of both my Dad and Brother, I knew its opening crawl well from a young age.  The very idea of a sequel to that masterpiece was frightening, but it’s now something I can’t deny or avoid.  …   [continue reading]

Rogue One Review: A Shallow “fix” for A New Hope

Hear the writers discuss this subject on the Secret Cave Podcast!

***This article will contain spoilers for Rogue One***

“That was a really good film. The ending was great!”

As the bloke two rows in front finished the longest spiel of his life and got up to leave, I knew I was fucked.

Because I was always going to write this Rogue One review.

And I thought it was a bit shit.

It wasn’t irredeemable – it had some pretty shots, some almost believable CGI people, and even made me laugh once or twice. However, it failed at so many hurdles that, come the intermission (Louth cinema is old and cute, with a halfway break for ice cream), I knew my mind was made up.…   [continue reading]

Live-Tweeting Reactions to ‘Alien’ (1979)

Hear the writers discuss this subject on the Secret Cave Podcast!

After several not-so friendly pokes in the ribs from Lee, I’ve caved and watched Alien.

I have no idea how I evaded it for so long, and it’s something I’m pretty ashamed about. However, I jumped at the chance to watch it as a way to write something a bit different for Secret Cave.

Scroll past my proper-writer analysis below to read the condensed, live-tweet version.

Shamefully late Alien first impressions

Unlike audiences at the time, or even the majority of normal people on Earth today, I’d been exposed to countless Alien imitators, but never the genuine article.…   [continue reading]


Hear the writers discuss this subject on the Secret Cave Podcast!  And again!

Ridley Scott’s Alien is one of the most obvious science fiction classics ever committed to film.  Every single aspect of this masterpiece is tightly woven and meticulously constructed.  It’s probably that, along with its great tale, keeping it so richly alive over the years since its release.  Now drowning in accolade, it seems the critics most definitely do get things right from time to time.  It’s still the best film in the series that followed it too, itself a notable collection of flicks (even if it does devolve across its course).  …   [continue reading]

Donnie Darko

Hear Lee and Ben B. discuss this subject on the Secret Cave Podcast!


Having recently enjoyed its 15th Anniversary, Donnie Darko is more than a good candidate for a Secret Cave write-up.  While it’s gotten a bit of a bad rep lately as a teen-angst movie with dark mystery enough to entice in the Emo crowd, what lies within is actually an intricate sci-fi jaunt of rich detail.  Despite its generally positive reviews and cult following, it’s still an extremely underrated movie – since most go along with its mystery without ever expecting to truly fathom its machinations.  The ending of Donnie Darko, for example, is not open to interpretation as many often claim.  …   [continue reading]